How to Avoid Side Mirror Damage

If you live in, or frequent, a particularly urban area or park your car on main roads often, you might approach your vehicle with a bit of apprehension after it’s been parked outside for a long while. After all, a lot can happen on a road over the course of several hours. One of the most common victims in these scenarios are your side mirrors. Tucking them in may help but things can still go awry. You might think driving with busted side mirrors is fine for a few days but if you get pulled over, you’re likely looking at some big fines. To avoid the situation altogether, take a look at some of our tips.

Park Your Car in a Safe Area

This is sometimes easier said than done, especially if you aren’t too privy to the area you’re parking in. One of the most common causes of damaged side mirrors is vandalism, though, so use visual cues to help inform your decision on whether the area is “safe” or not. Is there area well lit? Are there cameras? What does the surrounding neighborhood or area look like? These are all questions you should be asking yourself if you’re worried about the state of your vehicle. Vandals are more likely to mess around with your car if it’s parked in a dark area that’s far removed from the public eye.

Park Where There Are Fewer Vehicles

Parking in no man’s land usually means you have a walk a bit farther to get where you want to go, but it’s usually safer for your vehicle to do so. This way, you avoid overly packed parking lots with drivers of varying ability. Parking lots are great places for your car to get dinged up by careless folks. If you can’t leave your car in a more open area, do your best to situate it farther away from large clusters of vehicles. The small walk to your destination is worth saving yourself the potential headache of dealing with damaged auto glass.

 

Protect your side mirrors by utilizing our tips. If you frequent areas where you often have to leave your car unattended for several hours, or even a day or two, do your best to ensure the area where you leave your vehicle is safe. If you follow these pointers and still run into trouble, you can count on us here at AllStar Windshield Centers to solve the problem.

Watch Where You Park Your Car

This is likely no surprise, but where you park your car can have an impact on your auto glass. Plenty of windshield replacements and repairs each year are the result of objects hitting drivers’ windshields. If this happens to you, don’t hesitate to contact your nearest Windshield Center for help. If your windshield is only cracked but you can still see, bring it on into our center. If your auto glass is completely shattered, it’s best to take advantage of our mobile services to keep you and other drivers safe. Let’s take a look at a couple of things you should be aware of when parking your car.

Trees

Parking your car under a tree can actually be a catch-22. While your vehicle may get some shade or covering, there are plenty of things that can go wrong underneath a tree. One of the most major threats is a branch falling onto your car, and the bigger the branch the bigger issue you’re likely going to have to deal with. It’s important to beware of sap as well, as it can destroy your paint and stick to your windshield.

Construction Zones

It’s never a good idea to park your car near any construction project. The risk you run is your windshield or car getting hit or dinged with buckets, falling hammers, ladders, or other heavy equipment. A surefire way to avoid these scenarios is to avoid construction areas, even if it means parking farther away. It’s better to walk for a few more minutes than return to a car that has been damaged.

Roof Snow & Ice

The winters in New York can be brutal, which is why it’s important to pay attention to snow and ice drifts on the rooftops of buildings. If you have a garage at home, park your car in there for the entire winter season. This way, you can avoid ice falling from your roof and cracking or shattering your windshield. Pay attention when out in public as well, as commercial buildings can suffer from ice and snow drifts just as much as your home can.

Protect your auto glass from any unfortunate accidents and keep an eye on where you park your vehicle. If your windshield becomes the unfortunate victim of falling debris, trust the experts here at Windshield Centers to have you back on the road safely in no time!

4 Fall Driving Tips

As fall begins to settle in, summer seems but a distant, beautiful memory. To its credit, Fall is lovely and serves as the perfect transition from summer to winter. However, changes in temperature means changes in weather, so you must adapt your driving technique accordingly. There are some simple steps you can put into practice to be a better driver this fall season, so check out some of our recommendations.

1.) Replace Your Wiper Blades

Weather in the fall can be all over the place, so precipitation can be rather unpredictable. Therefore, it is essential to have reliable wiper blades installed on your car. Windshield wiper blades see a lot of use throughout the spring and summer months, so they are typically quite worn by the time fall rolls around. By getting ahead of the ball in the fall, you won’t have to stand outside in freezing cold weather just to replace your windshield wipers.

 

2.) Inspect the Windshield and All Windows

If you have a crack or chip in your windshield, it can get in the way of your vision even on a clear day. Add heavy rain fall and you can potentially have quite the problem on your hands, and a dangerous one at that. Give your car a good walk around, and examine all of your auto glass. If you spot anything that gives you pause, take it down to an auto glass repair shop and have it tended to. Getting your auto glass in good shape prior to winter gives it a much better chance of standing against winter’s brutal impact.

 

3.) Keep an Eye on Your Windshield Washer Fluid

Fall can introduce all sorts of mess to your windshield, including dirt and mud. Because of this, you’ll likely find yourself opting to clean your windshield more than you had in the summer months. To keep yourself from running out of windshield washer fluid (it happens far too often), be sure to keep some handy. Always having some at the ready ensures your windshield will be continuously clean for many months to come.

 

4.) Look Out for Deer

As seasons change, so do the habits of animals. Due to this, highways sometimes see much more deer activity throughout the fall. Those deer caution signs on the side of the road are there for a reason, so if you find yourself on a quiet stretch of highway be sure to keep alert. Deer typically don’t travel alone, either. If you spot one it’s highly likely one or two more aren’t far behind.

 

Thankfully, fall is a rather gentle season to ease into driving wise. Nothing quite compares to winter, but luckily that is still a few months off! For all of your auto glass needs throughout the fall, get in touch with Windshield Centers.

3 Crucial Tips on How to Prevent Fatal Heatstroke Car Deaths

As the temperatures continue to rise during the summer, the number of heat stroke accidents also tends to rise. Did you know that there is an average of 38 deaths per year caused by heatstroke inside a car? It can happen to any parent or babysitter. According to research done by San Francisco State University, at an average 70 degrees sunny day, after 30 minutes, the temperature inside a vehicle is 104 degrees. After an hour, it can reach 113 degrees. When the outside temperature range from 80 to 100 degrees, the temperature inside a car parked in direct sunlight can quickly climb to between 130 to 172. As a result, it is extremely crucial to not leave children behind in the vehicle especially in the summer.

Everyone must ACT if a child is left alone in car:

A: Always check the backseat of your vehicle before locking your vehicle. A good tip to do this is to keep a large stuffed animal in the child’s car seat. When the child is placed in the car seat, move the stuffed animal in front passenger seat. It could prove to be the difference as a result.

C: Create a habit of checking the back seat: Put an item or items that you will need before leaving your car, like a purse, cell phone, and wallet. This ensures that you have to open the back door to get the item and would not forget the child in the back seat.

T: Take action immediately if you see a child is left behind in a vehicle. Dial 9-1-1 to get immediate help. If the child is in a suffocating condition, get them out as quickly as possible by breaking the car window.

Five Ways to Avoid a Deer Collision

As of 2012, car and deer collisions have caused an average of 200 deaths and cost an estimated $4 billion every year in the US – and the chances of hitting one can increase depending on what state you live in. To make sure you aren’t another statistic, there are a few important ways to avoid hitting a deer that you should be familiar with, as these tips could save your life.

  • Check for signs
    This is one of the most obvious ways to prevent a collision with deer. Towns or highway departments will usually post these signs for a reason: that the area has high deer activity and perhaps car-deer collisions have occurred multiple times at those spots. These signs will usually appear in parks, forests, or waterway areas. Make sure to slow down and be alert.
  • Use high beams
    Another quick fix to avoiding a car-deer accident is to simply turn your headlights on whenever you are the only car on the road. High beams will afford a larger field of vision so you can prepare ahead of time to stop if there is a deer in or on the side of the road. Also pay attention to oncoming traffic headlights; a quick couple flicks of the high beams from an oncoming vehicle means to watch out ahead for deer.
  • Beware of the time
    Deer are shy creatures who, like humans, are often quite predictable when it comes to forming a routine or schedule. These animals love the hours around sunrise and sunset to graze – and it is these hours when it is hardest for us to adjust our eyes to the light. Always be on the lookout or plan your trip for a different time of day.
  • Know when to use the horn
    Although deer, moose, and other large forest animals are generally timid and will bolt at the slightest sign of people, they may become terrified when they see your approaching vehicle and stay firmly planted in the middle of the road. Stop the car (do not swerve into the opposite lane if you can help it) and wait a few seconds to see if they will move. Flick your lights on and off. As a last resort, use the horn in short bursts. Using a horn could cause a deer to become aggressive depending on the season.
  • When there’s one, there’s more
    Perhaps not so much the case for moose, this is almost always the case when you see a deer. One deer may be in the middle of the road, but the others could be hiding out along the shoulder waiting to follow their leader. After the first one has crossed, check both sides of the road with your high beams on to make sure there aren’t any more.

In the event that you do hit a deer, remembering to be a defensive driver, go the speed limit, and wearing your seat belt could end up preventing serious injury to both your car and you or your passengers. Safe travels!

Car Safety Tips for your Pets

For many families around the country, summer means family road trips. Whether you’re driving across the state or across the country, road trips are as fun as they are stressful. There is no better way to bond with family and friends than packing up the car and traveling down the highways and back roads of the country. But for many families, a road trip includes more than just the human members of the clan. Many dogs will get to ride along this summer and throughout the year as more and more families decide to take pet-friendly vacations. Here are a few tips for making sure that your dog has the best experience possible during your trip:

  • First of all, make sure you have the right sized car for handling an animal. Don’t force a medium-sized dog to spend hours in the back of a Honda Accord with all your bags. If this is your only option, you might be better off leaving the dog with a sitter while you’re gone. It’s recommended that wagons, SUVs, and mini-vans are used for long trips with an animal.
  • Get a crate that is large enough for your dog to stand up in. If it is big enough for a standing dog then they should be able get up and turn around during your trip. That is essential for the dog to find comfort during the trip. Get your dog used to the crate by having them use it a couple hours a day for a week leading up to the trip.
  • Make sure you put some miles on your dog before the trip! An experienced “rider” will be more easy going in the car, so make sure to bring your dog along for rides leading up to the big trip.
  • Never leave your pet alone in the car. Even with your windows cracked, your car becomes a furnace in no time and will cause heatstroke for your animals.
  • Stop every few hours for your dog to go to the bathroom and have a drink of water. Always attach a leash before you open the car door. Bring bottles of your own water with you.

 

Windshield Centers is a leading auto glass repair shop located in the greater Buffalo & Rochester, NY areas. Contact us online or at (800) 900-1505 to schedule windshield repair or replacement services today.

4 Safe Driving Tips for the Spring!

It’s finally spring and the flowers are blooming! You’d think now the roads are clear since there’s no ice or snow but think again, spring weather often brings on other hazardous road conditions like flooding, slippery roads and hail. Now that it is spring, there are new challenges when driving from the winter wear and tears, animal activity to just more drivers roaming the roads. Here are some tips to get you cruising into summer safely.

  • Tire pressures: After the winter, potholes and wet roads are a common scene, make sure you have enough air in your car tires so you don’t need to worry about having a flat tire or hydroplaning while driving.
  • Lights: In this season it often brings on rainy weather which prevents accurate visibility on the road. Examine your headlights, taillights, brake lights, parking lights, and of course your back up lights before driving in the spring.
  • Animal Activity: Many animals are coming out of hibernation, migrating, or it is their mating season so be aware when driving. You should especially watch out for animals roaming the roads during the early mornings and evenings since animals have peak activity at these times.
  • Increase in People: Warm weather brings not only animals out but people too. Be more careful to the traffic in residential and school zones since now children, cyclists and motorist are on the road/streets more.

With these simple tips you can enjoy the spring time on the road safely and care free!